+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 63

Thread: Cigars made in America

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Wichita, KS
    Posts
    7,154
    Blog Entries
    55

    Default Cigars made in America

    There are many cigars, some very popular and well known, that are made here in America. I've found that very few of them actually use American tobacco. The ones that use anything other than that wonderful CT shade leaf for wrapper are even fewer.

    The U.S.A. has a long history of tobacco growth and export. Even today, many of the tobaccos grown here are used in the production of premium pipe tobaccos.....think VA and Maryland and Perique, etc.

    Why not cigar tobacco? Yes, I know we make plenty of swisher sweets, etc...here, from tobaccos grown here. Glorified cigarettes aren't what I'm talking about.
    Last edited by ashauler; 03-07-2011 at 10:30 AM. Reason: spellin'
    Individual Liberty / Personal Responsibility

    "Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation for 'tis better to be alone than in bad company."
    George Washington

    I have two Russian clown dolls that sit on my dresser and whose eyes follow you around wherever you are in the room. At night, among some of their mischief, they mutter Russian obscenities and open my humidor and take all the wrappers off my cigars. I haven't noticed any difference. ~ Ted

  2. Default

    Try Munniemakers. It's an old American brand, machine made, but with CT fillers and wrappers, both shade and broadleaf. It's really quite a good cigar, not a cigarette in disguise. It's a true CT Puro. Hell, CC86's father used to smoke them.

    Doc.
    Do draft dodgers have reunions? And if so what do they talk about?
    Doc

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Wichita, KS
    Posts
    7,154
    Blog Entries
    55

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Devil Doc View Post
    Try Munniemakers. It's an old American brand, machine made, but with CT fillers and wrappers, both shade and broadleaf. It's really quite a good cigar, not a cigarette in disguise. It's a true CT Puro. Hell, CC86's father used to smoke them.

    Doc.
    I'll do that. I should also say that both CT and PA broadleaf have been used more recently in cigar production, they usually surround nic or dom or hond fillers though.

    With the diverse climates and soil types available here, I'm wondering why a premium long-filler cigar couldn't be produced. I bet it could, but producing one that is economically viable would be the challenge.
    Individual Liberty / Personal Responsibility

    "Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation for 'tis better to be alone than in bad company."
    George Washington

    I have two Russian clown dolls that sit on my dresser and whose eyes follow you around wherever you are in the room. At night, among some of their mischief, they mutter Russian obscenities and open my humidor and take all the wrappers off my cigars. I haven't noticed any difference. ~ Ted

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,694
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    I suspect it can be done, but there would be no money in it - growing is less expensive elsewhere, production is less expensive elsewhere, and the US has low duty and excise rates on cigars.

    There is also no well-known historic precedent for premium American-grown and -made cigars. The top premium brands (rolled in the US) historically used Cuban tobacco ("Clear Havana's") so there is no historical industry/romance to revive.

    The only US-grown premium that I know of is the Kauai Island Prince, although their wrappers are non-US, and, due to tax laws, the tobacco is processed and rolled in Nicaragua(!).
    Craig
    Ahhhhhhhhhhh Cigar Jesus just wept - kevin7
    A cigar storage primer | Basic Cuban cigar info

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Wichita, KS
    Posts
    7,154
    Blog Entries
    55

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by craig View Post
    I suspect it can be done, but there would be no money in it - snip........
    Perhaps.
    Individual Liberty / Personal Responsibility

    "Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation for 'tis better to be alone than in bad company."
    George Washington

    I have two Russian clown dolls that sit on my dresser and whose eyes follow you around wherever you are in the room. At night, among some of their mischief, they mutter Russian obscenities and open my humidor and take all the wrappers off my cigars. I haven't noticed any difference. ~ Ted

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Up shit's creek
    Posts
    1,844

    Default

    It seems in this day and age it’s more “PC” to grow marijuana than to grow tobacco.
    As states are outlawing tobacco, they are legalizing marijuana. Shame.
    It will always be a battle a day between those who want maximum change and those who want to maintain the status quo.
    ~ Gerry Adams

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    around
    Posts
    2,862
    Blog Entries
    16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by craig View Post
    I suspect it can be done, but there would be no money in it - growing is less expensive elsewhere, production is less expensive elsewhere, and the US has low duty and excise rates on cigars.
    I agree that growth and production are cheaper, but I'm not sure there wouldn't be any money in it. There's definitely a niche market for American-Made goods, whether it's tobacco, alligator-skinned boots, automobiles, whatever. Some people exclusively purchase American whenever possible.

    Quote Originally Posted by craig View Post
    There is also no well-known historic precedent for premium American-grown and -made cigars. The top premium brands (rolled in the US) historically used Cuban tobacco ("Clear Havana's") so there is no historical industry/romance to revive.
    True. And this would be the biggest hurdle. But I don't think it's impossible. Strategic marketing, appealing to both the cigar enthusiast and American consumer would have to be employed. I'm not saying it would be easy, I'm just saying it hasn't been done yet - not impossible, though.

    Quote Originally Posted by craig View Post
    The only US-grown premium that I know of is the Kauai Island Prince, although their wrappers are non-US, and, due to tax laws, the tobacco is processed and rolled in Nicaragua(!).
    To many in the continental US, Hawaii might as well be a foreign country.

    In conclusion, I would think that if the time and money were put into developing a superior product, it would find a market in the states. I've noticed that American cigarettes are consumed in foreign countries, so there's reason to believe American cigars, while may still be second to established Cuban counterparts, could still be a viable option in the humidor. I just don't think enough effort has been put in marketing.


    Age Quod Agis

    1 Strike

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,694
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mrtr33 View Post
    In conclusion, I would think that if the time and money were put into developing a superior product, it would find a market in the states. I've noticed that American cigarettes are consumed in foreign countries, so there's reason to believe American cigars, while may still be second to established Cuban counterparts, could still be a viable option in the humidor. I just don't think enough effort has been put in marketing.
    Marketing can accomplish a lot, I agree. However, the cigar doesn't have to be a puro to benefit - look at the CAO America - look at CAO, in fact. There are many American cigar companies that have produced, or could easily produce, in the US, but they don't seem to have to in order to retain their "American-ness."

    In any case, the defining characteristic of most premium cigar tobacco is that it is grown in volcanic soil. Cigar smokers are used to the flavour of tobacco grown in volcanic soil. An American puro (non-Hawaiian) would have to overcome that.
    Craig
    Ahhhhhhhhhhh Cigar Jesus just wept - kevin7
    A cigar storage primer | Basic Cuban cigar info

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Wichita, KS
    Posts
    7,154
    Blog Entries
    55

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by craig View Post
    Marketing can accomplish a lot, I agree. However, the cigar doesn't have to be a puro to benefit - look at the CAO America - look at CAO, in fact. There are many American cigar companies that have produced, or could easily produce, in the US, but they don't seem to have to in order to retain their "American-ness."

    In any case, the defining characteristic of most premium cigar tobacco is that it is grown in volcanic soil. Cigar smokers are used to the flavour of tobacco grown in volcanic soil. An American puro (non-Hawaiian) would have to overcome that.
    Interesting that a couple of notable exceptions to that are CT Shade and both CT and PA Broadleaf. Not sure if the soil is volcanic in nature in Cameroon or Mexico either. Without a doubt, the soil composition plays a large part in the flavor of a given tobacco, however, it is not the only factor.
    Individual Liberty / Personal Responsibility

    "Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation for 'tis better to be alone than in bad company."
    George Washington

    I have two Russian clown dolls that sit on my dresser and whose eyes follow you around wherever you are in the room. At night, among some of their mischief, they mutter Russian obscenities and open my humidor and take all the wrappers off my cigars. I haven't noticed any difference. ~ Ted

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Bitterville
    Posts
    6,266
    Blog Entries
    116

    Default

    I think the growing regions in Mexico such as the San Andres Tuxtla region and Cameroon, Africa are volcanic soils.

    Will
    The powers that be might take it all away
    Together we burn, together we burn away

    Uncle Tupelo

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,694
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ashauler View Post
    Interesting that a couple of notable exceptions to that are CT Shade and both CT and PA Broadleaf. Not sure if the soil is volcanic in nature in Cameroon or Mexico either. Without a doubt, the soil composition plays a large part in the flavor of a given tobacco, however, it is not the only factor.
    Very true, but CT Shade/broadleaf are primarily binders and wrappers. Filler tobacco is grown in both places, of course. The resulting mild taste is currently out of fashion with aficionado's, but these things often go in cycles.

    Mexico's cigar-tobacco-growing areas are volcanic IIRC, I don't know about Cameroon. Cameroon sun-grown wrapper has a unique taste, though - and a unique taste is what an American puro would need to succeed, I think.

    FYI, http://www.marshwheeling.com/ (seems to have PA broadleaf/Dom filler)
    http://www.fdgrave.com/ (Muniemaker)

    Neither is hand-rolled, though, AFAIK.
    Craig
    Ahhhhhhhhhhh Cigar Jesus just wept - kevin7
    A cigar storage primer | Basic Cuban cigar info

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Wichita, KS
    Posts
    7,154
    Blog Entries
    55

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by craig View Post
    snip.....and a unique taste is what an American puro would need to succeed, I think. snip
    There we go.
    Individual Liberty / Personal Responsibility

    "Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation for 'tis better to be alone than in bad company."
    George Washington

    I have two Russian clown dolls that sit on my dresser and whose eyes follow you around wherever you are in the room. At night, among some of their mischief, they mutter Russian obscenities and open my humidor and take all the wrappers off my cigars. I haven't noticed any difference. ~ Ted

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    around
    Posts
    2,862
    Blog Entries
    16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by craig View Post
    Marketing can accomplish a lot, I agree. However, the cigar doesn't have to be a puro to benefit - look at the CAO America - look at CAO, in fact. There are many American cigar companies that have produced, or could easily produce, in the US, but they don't seem to have to in order to retain their "American-ness."
    In the aforementioned example, however, I think what's ended up happening in this instance is over-marketing, to the point of almost being a gimmick. It doesn't immediately appear to me that this was an attempt to label the 'America' cigar as showcasing American tobacco as a gimmick of representing labels from anywhere tobacco could grow (Brazil, Italy). CAO, in my mind, would stop at nothing to put any kind of spin they could on any product they have in order to sell it. The cigar is not necessarily indicative of the country's tobacco.

    Quote Originally Posted by craig View Post
    Cameroon sun-grown wrapper has a unique taste, though - and a unique taste is what an American puro would need to succeed, I think.
    I agree with this statement - if it would happen here, there would need to be some kind of unique twist that would appeal to aficionados. I don't know that Cameroon sungrown is the answer, but something along those lines (jayhawk?).


    Age Quod Agis

    1 Strike

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,694
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mrtr33 View Post
    In the aforementioned example, however, I think what's ended up happening in this instance is over-marketing, to the point of almost being a gimmick. It doesn't immediately appear to me that this was an attempt to label the 'America' cigar as showcasing American tobacco as a gimmick of representing labels from anywhere tobacco could grow (Brazil, Italy). CAO, in my mind, would stop at nothing to put any kind of spin they could on any product they have in order to sell it. The cigar is not necessarily indicative of the country's tobacco.
    LOL. Almost a gimmick??? Well, they didn't make a Nub, that's true!

    I pointed out the CAO America as an example of a cigar that is marketed to appeal to Americans - and to Americans' patriotism - just as an American puro might be marketed (along with a unique taste) ... and yes, the CAO marketing fluff talks about American tobacco.

    In general, this issue is kinda like single malt whisky. Malt whisky is made in lots of places, but it takes good products plus a huge amount of marketing to establish a presence in the premium single malt market beyond Scotch. Japanese brands have made an impact - so it can be done.
    Craig
    Ahhhhhhhhhhh Cigar Jesus just wept - kevin7
    A cigar storage primer | Basic Cuban cigar info

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Some Chair in Greensburg, Pa
    Posts
    1,323

    Default

    Nice thread guys; never knew cigar tobacco is grown in volcanic soil.


    Yay! Cigars!

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia
    Posts
    6,485

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Devil Doc View Post
    Try Munniemakers. It's an old American brand, machine made, but with CT fillers and wrappers, both shade and broadleaf. It's really quite a good cigar, not a cigarette in disguise. It's a true CT Puro. Hell, CC86's father used to smoke them.

    Doc.
    LMAO!

    When I saw the title of the thread, Muniemakers were the fist cigars I thought of but Doc beat me to the post.

    Here's a link:

    FD Grave & Son, New Haven, CT

    TBSCigars - "On Holiday"
    Grammar - It's the difference between knowing your crap and knowing you're crap.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,694
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    It sounds like General has been growing Corojo in CT!

    http://www.cigaraficionado.com/webfe.../show/id/15903
    New Punch Made with New Wrapper
    Gregory Mottola
    Posted: March 30, 2011

    You've probably heard of the Punch Rare Corojo brand, but have you ever heard of Connecticut Corojo tobacco? It's a proprietary wrapper that General Cigar will be using on its new Punch Rare Corojo 10th Anniversary, a 5-inch long, 50 ring gauge cigar that has just started shipping to retailers.

    This release of the Punch Rare Corojo differs greatly from previous launches, as the Rare Corojo cigars have typically been made with Ecuadoran Sumatra wrappers.

    "For ten years, cigar enthusiasts have looked forward to the annual return of the Rare Corojo...a spicy no-nonsense blend at a reasonable price," said Rick Chandler, director of marketing for Punch cigars. "This year, we're pleased to have upped the ante by offering the classic Punch Rare Corojo along with the standout new taste of the 10th Anniversary frontmark."

    For more on the new cigar, and on the Connecticut Corojo tobacco, see the next issue of Cigar Insider.
    Craig
    Ahhhhhhhhhhh Cigar Jesus just wept - kevin7
    A cigar storage primer | Basic Cuban cigar info

  18. #18

    Default

    Such interesting tidbits to read about...
    :D

  19. Default Tatuaje's La Casita Criolla

    Tatuaje's La Casita Criolla was released in July 2011. The cigar is made with 100% Connecticut Broadleaf and is available in 3 sizes: corona, corona gorda, and short churchill. I can't remember the last time a premium cigar included entirely American tobacco. The cigars are rolled in Nicaragua. (If only this were done in Little Havana Miami, the entire production from seed to packaging would be completed in the USA!)

    Wrapper: CT Broadleaf USA
    Binder: CT Broadleaf USA
    Filler: CT Broadleaf USA
    Strength: Full-bodied

  20. #20

    Default

    Found this site: http://www.amishshop.com/hazel-doc/cigars.htm ,while researching growing my own. I believe the Amish cigars are made in Pennsylvania, and the Marsh Wheeling are made in Indiana.
    Last edited by FightingFish; 01-22-2012 at 09:55 PM. Reason: fact check

+ Reply to Thread

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

     

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts